Operators in C++ Programming



Definition of C++ Operators

There are many operators for manipulating numeric values and performing arithmetic operations. C++ provides many operators for manipulating data. Generally, there are three types of operators: unary, binary, and ternary.

These terms reflect the number of operands an operator requires. Unary operators only require a single operand. Binary operators work with two operands. Ternary operators, as you may have guessed, require three operands.

The arithmetic operators can be used for appropriate combinations of these types:

  • x+y // plus
  • + x // unar y plus
  • x − y // minus
  • − x // unar y minus
  • X * y //multiply
  • x / y // divide
  • x % y // remainder (modulus) for integers

The comparison operators in C++ are:

  • x == y // equal
  • x != y // not equal
  • x < y // less than
  • x > y // greater than
  • x <= y //less than or equal
  • x >= y // greater than or equal

Furthermore, logical operators are provided:

  • x & y // bitwise and
  • x | y // bitwise or
  • x ˆ y // bitwise exclusive or
  • ˜x // bitwise complement
  • x && y // logical and
  • x || y // logical or

C++ example with arithmetic operators

This examples program calculates hourly wages, including overtime.


   #include <iostream.h>
    using namespace std;
    int main()
     {
     double basePayRate = 18.25, // Base pay rate
     overtimePayRate = 27.38, // Overtime pay rate
     regularHours = 40.0, // Regular hours worked
     overtimeHours = 10, Overtime hours worked// 
     regularWages, // Computed regular wages
     overtimeWages, // Computed overtime wages
     totalWages; // Computed total wages
// Calculate regular wages
     regularWages = basePayRate * regularHours;
// Calculate overtime wages
     overtimeWages = overtimePayRate * overtimeHours;
// Calculate total wages
     totalWages = regularWages + overtimeWages;
// Display total wages
    cout << "Wages for this week are $" << totalWages << endl;
    return 0;
     }

Output:
    Wages for this week are $1003.8

The regular hours for the work week are 40, and any hours worked over 40 are considered overtime. The employee earns $18.25 per hour for regular hours and $27.38 per hour for overtime hours. The employee has worked 50 hours this week. Notice that the output displays the wages as $1003.8, with just one digit after the decimal point.


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